Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via fecal-oral and aerosols–borne routes: Environmental dynamics and implications for wastewater management in underprivileged societies www.sciencedirect.com April 10, 2022, 6:48 p.m.
Although there is no current evidence showing that coronaviruses can be transmitted through contaminated drinking water, there is a growing concern on the impact of the current pandemic wave on underprivileged societies because of their poor wastewater treatment infrastructures, overpopulation, and outbreak management strategies. More research is encouraged to trace the actual fate of SARS-CoV-2 in the environment and to develop/revise the disinfection strategies accordingly.
Dermal Delivery of a SARS-CoV-2 Subunit Vaccine Induces Immunogenicity against Variants of Concern www.mdpi.com April 10, 2022, 6:45 p.m.
In this study, a modified, HexaPro S protein subunit vaccine, delivered using a needle-free high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP), was investigated for its immunogenicity and virus-neutralizing abilities. Mice given two doses of the vaccine candidate generated potent antibody responses capable of neutralizing the parental SARS-CoV-2 virus as well as the variants of concern, Alpha and Delta. These results demonstrate that this alternative vaccination strategy has the potential to mitigate the effect of emerging viral variants.
Study finds higher risk of thrombotic events after SARS-CoV-2 infection www.news-medical.net April 10, 2022, 6:41 p.m.
A study from Sweden published by The BMJ today finds an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in the leg) up to three months after covid-19 infection, pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in the lung) up to six months, and a bleeding event up to two months. The findings also show a higher risk of events in patients with underlying conditions (comorbidities), patients with more severe covid-19, and during the first pandemic wave compared with the second and third waves.
Plenty of Evidence for Recombination in SARS-CoV-2 www.the-scientist.com April 10, 2022, 6:40 p.m.
Recombination—the exchange of genetic material between genomes—is common in coronaviruses because of the way they copy their RNA genomes. During replication, the RNA-synthesizing enzyme these viruses use duplicates shorter sections close to the end of the genome in addition to making the long template it needs for generating whole-genome copies. Furthermore, the enzyme is prone to switching from one template to another, so if a cell has multiple viral genomes in it, the enzyme may stitch together bits from different viruses to create a kind of Frankenstein genome.
Guillain–Barré Syndrome Associated with SARS-CoV-2 www.nejm.org April 10, 2022, 6:39 p.m.
On the basis of this observational series involving five patients, it is not possible to determine whether severe deficits and axonal involvement are typical features of Covid-19–associated Guillain–Barré syndrome. We could not determine the effect of reduced vital capacity due to neuromuscular failure from Guillain–Barré syndrome in these patients, but such an effect might be considered if findings on chest imaging are not commensurate with the severity of respiratory insufficiency. Guillain–Barré syndrome with Covid-19 should be distinguished from critical illness neuropathy and myopathy, which tend to appear later in the course of critical illness than Guillain–Barré syndrome.
SARS-CoV-2 detected using smartphone biosensor www.news-medical.net April 10, 2022, 6:38 p.m.
Although the majority of individuals who are infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) will remain asymptomatic, they are still capable of transmitting the virus the others. In addition to the widespread prevalence of asymptomatic carriers, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can also be difficult to diagnose, as those who are asymptomatic often experience symptoms similar to both the flu and pneumonia.
Role of natural immunity to SARS-CoV-2 on post-vaccination antibody responses in staff and residents of long-term care facilities www.news-medical.net April 10, 2022, 6:38 p.m.
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that has led to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has caused 400 million infections throughout the world, with 78 million infections in the United States (US) alone. Two million of those infections are reported in staff and residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). They represent around 16% of total deaths in the US.
SARS-CoV-2 mutations capable of widespread T-cell escape www.news-medical.net April 10, 2022, 6:38 p.m.
Both natural infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and immunization against this virus can generate SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies and T-cells. However, the level of immunity provided by these methods is challenged by the evolution of SARS-CoV-2, which has led to the emergence of new genetic variants like the Omicron variant.
A massive study finds diabetes risk rises after COVID-19 interestingengineering.com April 2, 2022, 3:25 p.m.
The researchers saw that the risk of developing diabetes rose as COVID-19 severity increased. When compared to people who did not have COVID-19 and were not hospitalized or admitted to intensive care, those who were hospitalized or admitted to intensive care had roughly four times the risk.
Partnering with Big Tech didn't help governments fight COVID. But it did waste a lot of money. therealnews.com March 18, 2022, 11:25 p.m.
Basic public health initiatives—such as hiring contact tracers, providing facilities and financial compensation for quarantining, knocking on doors to decrease vaccine hesitancy, and providing free masks, tests, and vaccines—have proven to be the best ways to save lives during the pandemic. Unfortunately, many governments have chosen instead to partner with Big Tech to implement needlessly complex initiatives that do little more than boost large companies’ profits and increase surveillance.
Sanofi, GSK Covid-19 vax is now ready for regulators; its future may be as a booster medcitynews.com Feb. 24, 2022, 8:33 a.m.
Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline weathered clinical trial delays for their Covid-19 vaccine, but the partners now have data to support filings seeking regulatory authorizations. Key features of the vaccine may be able to persuade the vaccine hesitant; it may also be well-suited for use as a booster.
China Believes That Omicron Variant Found Its Way to the Country via Mail interestingengineering.com Jan. 18, 2022, 3:17 p.m.
Chinese authorities have already decided that the general public will not be sold tickets at the Games but the detection of the first Omicron case weeks before the grand event will raise alarm bells. BBC reported that China follows a "dynamic zero COVID" policy which includes mass vaccinations, constant testing, and tracking people's movements using smartphones to stay on top of outbreaks. In November last year, city officials in Shanghai had tested 33,000 people after one case of COVID was reported in Disneyland.
FDA expands Covid-19 boosters for kids using real-world data in much older adults medcitynews.com Jan. 5, 2022, 8:36 p.m.
The FDA has expanded emergency authorization of Covid-19 boosters to include children 12 to 15 vaccinated with the Pfizer and BioNTech messenger RNA shot. The decision is based on a study that found boosting reduced deaths by 90%, but that Israeli analysis only evaluated these shots in people 50 and older.
Omicron infection induces cross-reactive immune responses www.news-medical.net Dec. 31, 2021, 6:21 p.m.
The massive surge in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infections across the globe due to the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant (B.1.1.529) has resulted in a new health crisis. The Omicron variant is highly transmissible due to immune evasive characteristics which have led to Omicron replacing the other variants of concern (VOCs) such as the Delta variant in several African and European countries. The neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) elicited by vaccines or passive antibody therapies have been found to have diminished neutralizing ability against the Omicron variant.
The US Army Made a Coronavirus Vaccine That Works Against All Variants interestingengineering.com Dec. 24, 2021, 4:09 p.m.
Vaccine makers are racing against time to develop a variant-specific booster should previously administered vaccines fail against the Frankenstein mix of mutations that the Omicron variant possesses. Although preliminary data shows that vaccines and boosters are likely to offer protection, for now, the possibility of another variant cannot be dismissed.
Pfizer Covid Pill: The FDA Just Authorized Pfizer’s First Covid-19 Pill interestingengineering.com Dec. 23, 2021, 5:55 p.m.
The drug will be made available to patients 12 years and older who are at high risk for developing a severe infection, the FDA said in its announcement. Patients who are prescribed the treatment will take 30 pills over five days. The prescription-only medicine should be taken as soon as possible after diagnosis, according to the agency. This is the first anti-viral pill researchers have approved to treat covid-19. The federal government has agreed to pay Pfizer $5.3B for 10 million courses of the treatment, NPR reports.
BioNTech CEO: omicron is partial escape variant, but booster may restore protection medcitynews.com Dec. 8, 2021, 10:49 p.m.
Preliminary data suggest the BioNTech and Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine may have diminished protection against the omicron variant, but that levels of neutralizing antibodies can be restored with a third shot. Real-world data are needed to further assess the vaccine’s efficacy against the new variant and whether an omicron-specific version of the shot is needed.
The Coronavirus in a Tiny Drop www.nytimes.com Dec. 1, 2021, 9:36 p.m.
To better understand the coronavirus’s journey from one person to another, a team of 50 scientists has for the first time created an atomic simulation of the coronavirus nestled in a tiny airborne drop of water.
Antidote COVID-19: A Vaccine Awareness Game iamtheshield.com Nov. 18, 2021, 8:54 a.m.
Antidote COVID-19 is an addictive tower defence game, where the player helps the human immune system fight off bacteria and viruses, including the dreaded SARS-CoV-2, the culprit behind the COVID-19 pandemic. Antidote COVID-19 is not only a fun game to play but also a brilliant way to learn more about the immune system, pathogens and how to stay safe from COVID-19.